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The Art of the ImPossible podcast - EPISODE 5

Education and industry working together

Transformative innovation carries with it the biggest amount of risk, but also the greatest amount of reward.

No surprise most organizations are hell-bent on trying to find their next big transformation. But how do we enable SME manufacturers to de-risk and dilute the amount of transformative innovation they do? Is it purely staff training? Or staff hiring? Or is it a combination of both?

Listen to the podcast below

Tune in to learn more about the transformational impact preventing more businesses to take on board innovation and university collaboration. 

According to a paper published on Harvard Business, we can divide innovation into three types: Incremental, making small regular improvements to the things that we do; adjacent innovation, which is taking something we're already very good at and applying that technology to an adjacent market; and the Holy Grail, which is transformational or transformative innovation. What's really interesting is that the top-performing companies tend to have a blend or a balance of those three types of innovation.

In this episode, we highlight how although the transformative type of innovation is the one that carries with it the biggest amount of risk, it is also the type that provides the greatest amount of reward. No surprise most organizations are hell-bent on trying to find their next big transformation. 

To explore this topic, Asif Moghal is joined by Paul Perera, technology manager at myMaskFit, and Nicole Pellizzon, aeronautical engineer undergraduate at Imperial College London. They discuss the transformational impact of their individual experiences; what’s preventing more businesses to take on board innovation; the increased push to crowdsource expertise; and how SMEs and universities can collaborate. 

Technology has the potential to make us achieve great things, but it won’t get us anywhere without the right leadership behind it. Press play to find out how we can enable SME manufacturers to de-risk and dilute the amount of transformative innovation they do, questioning whether it comes down to purely staff training, hiring or both.

 

Biography

Paul Perara

Paul worked across the global supply chain in both Aerospace and Defence, and across the lifecycle from R&T, engineering, manufacturing engineering, introduction into service, and in-service support.

His last three decades started as an undergraduate apprentice and moved into Airbus as Future Programmes engineer doing model-based optimization on Fortran 77, he has worked in BAE Systems in Brazil and with Embraer to develop new technology transfer into their Unmanned and manned defense programs with SAAB, he worked in the Ministry of Defence on secondment in Supply chain digitalization based on his experience of Naval support and Exostar.com which he helped form.

Paul had a role in Rolls-Royce Strategy and Future Programmes delving into power and propulsion where he pushed for Low carbon Hydrogen solutions and brought a strategy which is now being enacted in his GKN Aerospace role.

Nicole Pellizzon

Nicole is currently in her final year at Imperial College London studying for her MEng in Aeronautical Engineering. As an Autodesk Student Ambassador, Nicole has gained experience over the years in teach Fusion 360 and is now one of the first tutors at Teach 3D.  

Recently, she has been putting her interest in flying objects into practice by designing flying wings for the Imperial College Drone Society as well as collaborating to create a trainer fixed-wing aircraft. She also takes an interest in machine learning and data science and uses these as an excuse to code in her free time.