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Projects

MRI to 3D: biomedical simulation using mechanical engineering technology

February 15-April 13, 2012

Researchers from Michigan State University transformed 2D MRI data into 3D anatomical models to simulate blood flow changes in a study designed to help prevent pressure ulcers.

The project
Dr. Tamara Reid Bush and PhD candidate Abinand Manorama’s IDEA Studio project addressed the treatment and prevention of pressure ulcers. These potentially fatal wounds often afflict people who are confined to beds or wheelchairs.

The approach
Using 2D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data from a forearm, Manorama used Autodesk software to create 3D models and simulations. He used these simulations to study blood flow in an effort to understand and prevent formation of pressure ulcers. He then used Inventor software to create a 3D model from the MRI images. The model was then imported into Simulation Multiphysics software, where simulated load forces and boundary conditions could be applied to bone, muscle, and skin.

Through these simulations, the team determined that blood flow significantly decreased with the addition of shear loads on both the artery and vein. In the future, researchers can use the model to help determine blood flow changes in other areas of the body as well, near bones, skin, or other lateral or medial areas.

The results
Simulated pressure loads ranging from 0 to 20 newtons provided data for computational fluid dynamics. Using the 3D model in Simulation Multiphysics, Manorama was able to visualize and analyze changes in blood flow in different regions of the forearm.

Through these simulations, the team determined that blood flow significantly decreased with the addition of shear loads on both the artery and vein. In the future, researchers can use the model to help determine blood flow changes in other areas of the body as well, near bones, skin, or other lateral or medial areas.

Autodesk design and engineering solutions
Inventor
Simulation Multiphysics

Project team

  • Abinand Manorama, Doctoral Candidate/Graduate Research Assistant, Biomechanical Design Research Laboratory, Michigan State University
  • Dr. Tamara Reid Bush, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University

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