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Inspiration Archives

Designers and architects reflect on why they got into design and architecture, and how they stay inspired.

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Davey McEathron

Davey McEathron of Davey McEathron Architecture talks to us about his two-person residential projects and custom fabrication firm in Austin, Texas.

Davey's Inspirations

How old were you when you first thought about a career in architecture?

"When I was 30 and a professional musician (read: poor)"

What person most inspires you?

"I get inspiration from tons of people, but most comes from raw materials."

When I'm not designing buildings, you can find me ________ .

"... building furniture or hanging out under an oak tree at Barton Springs."

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Davey's Story

I was on tour with my band and had just turned 30 and kind of had that "where's my life headed?" moment, given the rate at which my musical career was moving. I began to wonder what opportunities were out there for me to be creative, but to actually have a career as well.

A friend of mine had given me a copy of a book called The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand because she thought that architecture was an interesting career. So while I was on tour I started reading this book, and it totally clicked that architecture could be a creative field.

What inspired you to get into architecture?

I was on tour with my band and had just turned 30 and kind of had that “where’s my life headed?” moment, given the rate at which my musical career was moving. I began to wonder what opportunities were out there for me to be creative, but to actually have a career as well.

A friend of mine had given me a copy of a book called The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand because she thought that architecture was an interesting career. So while I was on tour I started reading this book, and it totally clicked that architecture could be a creative field.

What do you like best about the work you do, and how does BIM help with that?

As a musician, you create your art, and you put it out there. If you hear a record you worked on getting played on the radio, that's a very rewarding feeling. And that's one of the things I like about architecture: you can see something you personally designed getting a lot of use and enjoyment by other people.

BIM helps out by automating a lot of the process. I spend less time on drafting, and I can put that extra time towards designing a better building.

What project are you most proud of?

To my point about seeing something you personally had a hand in developing being embraced by the public: there are several civic projects that I worked on that are a short driving distance from my house, and I pass by them on a regular basis. One of them is a municipal pool, and every time I go by it, it's completely packed.

How do you stay inspired and keep your creative juices flowing?

I live in Austin, and it's a very creative community. I get a lot of inspiration from the creative people here, whether that be musicians, comedians, carpenters, restaurateurs, graphic designers, hairstylists - you name it. Everyone's doing something creative in this town, and I feel that we all inspire each other, which makes it fun and exciting to be here.

Have you won work because of your use of BIM?

The efficiencies that are built into a BIM program are one of the things that we tout when we are in front of a client trying to win that business. When you show a client a 3D model and start spinning it round, it kind of blows their mind.

What is your dream project?

I like building public spaces, and being a musician, a museum of musical history of Austin would be a really fun project to take on. There's such a rich musical history in Austin that spans many musical styles, from country & western to rock 'n' roll to punk rock to blues and jazz. Every kind of music imaginable has some sort of history here. A lot of original places that have history here are being removed to make room for new ones, and a lot of history is being lost, so an artifact to capture that and respect and honor that would be an ideal project.

For more on Davey's projects visit: Davey McEathron Architecture

Interested in sharing your story? Email BIMarchitecture@autodesk.com

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